How do I hang a wall hanging?

Step 1 — Choose a location

We find it is best to choose a location;>

  • Brightly lit, but not in direct sunlight
  • On a wall that contrasts in shade and/or color with the wallhanging
  • Where the wall hanging can be seen from a distance and up close
  • Away from heat or air conditioning ducts

Some suggestions:

  • On a foyer wall
  • On a wall near your dining or kitchen table
  • On the wall behind a sofa
  • On the wall above a bed’s header board

Step 2 — Choose hanging treatment

Rectangular wall hangings can be hung using decorative rods (where the rod is intended to be seen), or hung so that only the wallhanging is seen. The choice is personal and is certainly influenced by the style of your home’s decor.

Most non-rectangular wall hangings (such as double wedding rings) cannot be hung with rods.

Specialty quilt hangers can be used for hanging wall hanging size quilts, but while these devices are good for hanging large quilts, they are not needed to hang small quilts. They tend to hide the top couple of inches of the quilt they are holding, which isn’t a problem with a bed quilt, but can be with a smaller quilt. They are also much more expensive than using a rod.

Step 3a – Hanging with a rod

Hanging rods can be purchased at any store that sells drapery hardware (building supply stores, department stores, drapery shops).Ask for cafe rods. Adjustable length metal rods with various finishes are available and range in price from less than $10 to as much as $30. Wooden drapery poles can also be used, which are available in a variety of finishes with decorative finials (the fancy end-pieces). These finished rods come with mounting hardware. If you are so inclined, you may wish to make and finish your own rod by purchasing a dowel rod (about1/2 inch diameter) and finials.

Many of our wall hangings include sleeves or tabs for hanging rods. The photos below show the difference between tabs and a sleeve.



With tabs the entire length of the rod is visible


With a sleeve, only the end of the rod is visible

If your rectangular quilt was not made with tabs or a sleeve, we can arrange for tabs or a sleeve to be added to your wall hanging before it is shipped (it typically will delay shipment by two days and add $10 to $20 to the price). If you desire that this be done, add a note to the Customer Comments section of the order form.

You, of course, may add your own tabs to a wall hanging, if you are not comfortable with sewing you can add tabs made from fabric ribbons (one inch wide andthree inches long) attached to the back of the wall hanging with safety pins as shown below.

Step 3b – Hanging without a rod

Believe it or not, the Amish solution is Velcro! Velcro is available at most fabric stores and hardware stores. Velcro self-adhesive Velcro tabs (or strips) can be attached to the top back edge of your wall hanging (with the adhesive, or hand sew, or if you prefer with straight pins).

The corresponding Velcro tabs can be directly attached to the wall. Alternatively, for a rectangular wall hanging, the tabs can be attached to a wooden strip and the wooden strip hung on the wall with a nail. The strip should be approximately2 inches wide, 1/2 inch thick, and long enough to reach across the back of your wall hanging and long enough to reach across the back of your wall hanging.

How should I care for a quilt?

Always remember and respect the hours of work that went into the making your quilt. To assure long life for your quilt, proper care is essential.

Wash or Dry Clean?

Most quilt lovers prefer to wash rather than dry clean their quilts. But some quilts can not be safely washed. If a quilt has loose lace or puffy applique work, machine washing is very risky and the quilt should be professionally dry cleaned. Also, while all of the fabrics used in quilts are supposed to be color fast, sometimes a fabric that will run is mistakenly used. Look out for fully saturated dark colored fabrics and hand-dyed ones as they the ones are most likely to run. Before washing, test the suspect fabric by rubbing it with a piece of white cotton moistened with very hot water. If the color transfers to the white cotton, don’t wash the quilt — even in cold water. Instead, get the quilt professionally dry cleaned. If you must dry clean your quilt be sure to air it (outside if possible) before using it.

Washing

It is generally fine to wash your quilt in a home washing machine, though for a very large quilt you may need a commercial size machine. To wash a quilt, use cold water and a mild detergent(that is free of perfumes, brightners, and bleach). Run the machine on a short gentle cycle. To keep the colors bright, add half a cup of vinegar to the wash cycle.

Drying

Quilts are heavy when wet. Try to support its wet weight so that the threads don’t pop. It is OK to partially dry a quilt in a dryer, but it is best to lay a quilt flat on rack to dry. Some people like to finish drying their quilt out on the grass on a sunny day! Do not iron your quilt.

How Often?

Washing or dry cleaning a soiled quilt will extend its life; washing or dry cleaning a clean quilt will shorten its life. Quilts that are used every day normally only need washing once a year. But if you have pets or children, more frequent washing may be desirable. Airing quilts (on a drying rack outside) between washings is a good practice.

Quilting Marking

On a new quilt you may note white or gray lines running through the quilting. These quilting markings are part of the process quilters use here to make sure the quilting is properly applied to the quilt. If a line is white, it is probably chalk and can be brushed off or easily removed with a damp cloth. Also the first time your quilt is washed or dry cleaned the chalk marks will disappear. If the lines are gray they were probably made with a pencil and can be removed with a gum eraser. Quilting marking is part of the craft of Lancaster quilts.

Storing

When not in use your quilt should be stored in a dry, dark location in a cotton or muslin bag — never store your quilt in a plastic bag or cardboard box. For wall hangings a cotton pillow case should be used. Be sure the quilt is clean before you store it away. Every other month or so it is a good idea to take the quilt out and refold it another way before putting it back in the bag. When you take your quilt out of storage, air it out. Lay it on the grass and let the sun penetrate it, or tumble it in a cool dryer for a short time.

Minor Repairs

Before washing or dry cleaning your quilt it is wise to inspect your quilt for seams that have come loose and repair them prior to the washing or dry cleaning.

What is an Amish Quilt?

There are a variety of definitions of what makes a quilt, an Amish Quilt.

  • For many people, an Amish quilt is any quilt that uses any combination of the traditional quilt block patterns and only uses solid dark fabrics ranging in color from red to blue to green on the color wheel.
  • For some others, Amish quilts encompass all quilts that Old Order Amish use in their homes. This broadens the first definition to include Amish “summer” quilts that typically have a white background and a traditional block pattern made with solid color fabrics ranging from red to green.
  • Another definition, is that an Amish quilt is any quilt made by Old Order Amish ladies (Amish men do not make quilts). Amish ladies make quilts with printed and solid fabrics, and traditional block patterns as well as non-traditional designs. Most of the quilts that they make to sell would not be appropriate for them to use in their own homes. A little broader version would include quilts made by Mennonite ladies as well.
  • A much broader variation of this last definition: An Amish quilt is any quilt that is similar to the quilts made by Amish and Mennonite ladies.

While all these definitions have merit, we use the first definition here. Where appropriate though, we may say that a non-Amish quiltincorporates Amish colors, or a traditional Amish block pattern.

What is a Quilt?

Quilts are the biggest pieces of art most people can put in their homes. They can be bright and bold, soft and subtle, traditional, or avant-garde. In any event, the first reaction to a well designed quilt is WOW!

What’s more well designed, hand-made quilts are amazing bargains. Today, quilters in Pennsylvania earn less $2.00 per hour for their work. Hopefully, with the demand for such good quilts increasing, their earnings and the price of their quilts will rise.

Quilting is centuries old, and involves simply running stitches to anchor a soft filler between two layers of fabric. These stitches traditionally follow a systematic pattern to create a subtle textured fabric surface. The quilting pattern alone is, typically, the only source of decoration on the back-side of an Amish or Mennonite style quilt. The top fabric layer of an Amish or Mennonite style quilt is normally a patchwork, and may include appliqués. Part of the challenge of designing a quilt is the melding of the design of the patchwork (and/or appliqués) with the pattern of quilting stitches.

The traditional quilting block patterns (Log Cabin, Lone Star, Bear’s Paw, etc.) are used alone or in combination to make Amish or Mennonite style quilts.

Links to Interesting Websites

Here are some links that we found interesting — you may too! If you would like to have us consider adding a link — please send us an email.

  • Quiltingjr.com — Quilt Jr. was started by Martha and Alma when their grandchildren became old enough to start sewing. They realized how important it was to pass on the skills and love of quilting they had learned from their mothers and grandmothers to their own children and grandchildren.
  • QuiltGem Cards — Created by Lancaster, PA artist and our friend Melissa Carroll, QuiltGem Greeting Cards begin with her original fine art photograph of a gem, rock or mineral from the extensive collection of her late father, John M. Ward. By manipulating the mineral’s colors, textures and natural shapes, the artist “stitches” portions of detail from the photograph to create the repeated, quilt-inspired design to create the final art for QuiltGem Cards.
  • Babies Online FREE Birth Announcements — Create a web page for your new baby, complete with pictures, instantly and for free! Tons of other great (and free!) stuff for new and expectant parents too, so check it out!!
  • Baby Place — The starting point for information on pregnancy, birth and babies.
  • Quilt Seeds Designs — Original Foundation Pieced Quilt Patterns. Free Blocks, Projects and Mystery Quilts. Quilt patterns for sale.
  • PickleDish.com — Our name comes from a favorite Kansas City Star quilt pattern, the Pickle Dish, published in The Star in October 1931. We celebrate all of the wonderful Star patterns, published from 1928 to 1960. Please join our community of quilters! 
  • Pennsylvania Dutch Country Welcome Center — This website will guide you to all you need to whet your appetite and plan your itinerary. You can even request attraction and lodging reservations online 
  • Quilters Warehouse — Quilt shop offering quilt patterns and quilting fabrics. Specializing in quilt patterns for patchwork, applique, and paper piecing. Thimbleberries and block of the month are also available.
  • QuiltChat — Where Quilters Gather Round the Frame 
  • quilten.pagina.nl — A real Dutch quilt page with lots of links to web sites in The Netherlands.
  • denverfabrics.com — Fashion fabrics and quilting fabrics, sewing patterns, sewing notions and sewing supplies, quilting supplies, sewing books and iron-on appliques
  • Lost Quilt Come Home — Lost quilts? Stolen quilts? Most quilters never consider the possibility until they experience the trauma of a missing quilt. On the Lost Quilt Come Home Page , pictures of lost and stolen quilts are displayed with the hope that some missing quilts will be recovered.
  • ThreadArt.com — Quilting and Embroidery Supplies for the Thread Artist — all you need to create that special project! 
  • Quilters Express Tours — Tours to quilt shops in St. Louis, Missouri
  • Haka Sewing Furniture — Offers unique modular sewing and quilting cabinets, cutting tables,cut-sew-serge tables and custom solutions. Hand crafted in Canada since 1989.
  • Piecemakers Country Store — Crafts, quilt patterns and The Holy Spirit! A surprising little shop that is the entrepreneurial center of a California Christian commune. 
  • CompuQuilt — Lots of information, ideas, and products to help you use your computer for quilting projects.
  • Quilting in Hungary — Did you know that quilting is popular in Hungary? This site has links to a great collection of Hungarian Quilting sites.
  • Bed Decorations: Quilting 101 — Great article that covers quilting history and museums, shows, charities, associations and societies, and learning how to quilt.

All Small Quilts

Wall Hangings and Crib Quilts

These small quilts were selected to please demanding quilt lovers. Showing a diversity of patterns, styles, and colors, these quilts are all beautifully designed and very well constructed. Note how carefully each has been pieced and hand quilted. These quilts are the best of the best Lancaster has to offer — they are far superior to the small quilts made as souvenirs for tourists.

While small compared to a bed quilt, these wall hangings are still large in comparison with most paintings or prints found in homes. With their dramatic use of color and texture they can become the visual focal point of any room in your home. Consider lighting them as you would a fine painting.

As with our larger quilts, these quilts are made one at a time in Amish and Mennonite homes — they are not mass produced. We only have one of each to sell.

The small quilts listed below are available for immediate sale and when ordered will be shipped, almost always, no later than the next business day. This page is updated when new quilts are listed or quilts sold.

If you see a small quilt that you love, but it is the wrong size — please contact us. We can check to see if a similar well-made small quilt in the right size is available. We can also arrange for a small quilt to be custom made.

Showing 1–40 of 282 results

  • Classic design and brilliant coloring. A fabulous display of hand quilting. Will dazzle any quilt lover. Named after a northeastern Indiana township. The quilt top was made by an Amish woman living near there and the quilting was done by one of her Amish neighbors. Includes a sleeve for a hanging rod. This quilt would look amazing in a home or office!
  • A stunning Lone Star with true brilliant red, orange and yellow cotton fabrics! The cotton background fabric is midnight blue (just a touch away from black). Note the fine abundant quilting and exceptionally careful piecing! The quilt top was made by an Amish woman living in north eastern Indiana and the quilting was done by one of her Amish neighbors. Includes a sleeve for a hanging rod. This wall hanging would look amazing in your home or office!
  • The color, shape and the dimension in this Tumbling Block displays C Jean Horst’s disciplined ability to arrange colors in a totally symmetrical way and yet produce a complex overall design. There are stars and three dimensional blocks, easy to spot with careful inspection. Also the blocks rotate around a small black star central to the quilt. The light colored top of each block moves as the blocks rotate around, forming a jagged circle. Perhaps the quilt gets its name from the multiple lines of symmetry that intersect and echo throughout, or possibly from the way the colored blocks seem to tumble out from the center black star. The quilting was done inside the blocks. Squint your eyes and enjoy a somewhat different view of this kaleidoscope of color. ! Magnificant office wall or foyer piece. 100% cotton fabrics. Sleeve has been added for hanging or it could be used as a throw. This has 8 hand quilted stitches per inch and is well quilted. 100% cotton fabrics !

Bed Quilts

Our cozy handmade quilts will warm and bring the sun back into your home. They also make great gifts any time of the year, and will bring years of delight to the lucky recipient. Take a look at our latest additions.

Quilts made in Lancaster reflect the diversity of culture and the comfortable lifestyles of the peoples that have settled here. Lancaster’s verdant beauty and highly productive farmland gave its settlers the inspiration as well as the time and money to engage in the creation of amazing quilts.

Handmade bed quilts made in Lancaster today, build on its traditions — most quilters adapt patterns seen in 18th and 19th Century Lancaster County quilts. However, there isn’t a drive here to simply replicate Great Grandmother Zook’s best quilts. Instead, Lancaster’s current generation of quilters are striving to outdo their grandmothers and create even more amazing quilts. The low cost, high quality, and multitude of printed fabrics give these modern quilters a palette their grandmothers could not imagine.

Early quilts were made for personal use, often in response to a birth or a wedding. As a matter of pride and respect, these quilts were made to very high standards at a time when most women were already very proficient with a needle and thread. Some of Lancaster’s quilters today match their forebears in stitching and attention to detail, even in quilts that they make for others.

High quality Lancaster handmade quilts more than hold their value. Well cared for Lancaster quilts, similar to the ones offered here, that were made 25 years ago typically sell at auction for twice their purchase price.

The beauty and visual impact of the bed quilts we offer cannot, of course, be completely captured in a photograph or even a series of photographs — but we do our best to give you a good look! Folks who have bought our quilts tell us that they look even better on their beds than on their computer screens.

If you see a quilt that you love, but it is the wrong size — please contact us . We can check to see if a similar well-made quilt in the right size is available. We can also arrange for a quilt to be custom made.

Showing 1–50 of 1225 results

  • Sharp! Wonderful collection of fabrics from this quilters bag of remnants. Remnants are oldies and current fabrics. Classic log cabin design well made by a local Mennonite woman. Nicely quilted and carefully pieced.
  • Wow! A very beautiful quilt in lovely Navy and Blue colors. What great fabric selections put into a quilt blending two favorite patterns, Log Cabin and Lone Star!!!! The background fabric is a soft tan swirl design print. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman and very finely quilted by a Amish woman in her home.
  • The Log Cabin quilt design is one of the oldest and best loved of all quilts. Here the classic design made new! Nicely pieced and beautifully hand quilted. Pieced and quilted by Amish woman.
  • The back of this quilt is covered with a solid cream cotton fabric. The quilting density is good with about 110 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is good with 7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • A stunning, beautiful quilt. Featuring bright fabrics blended into a lovely combination of two very popular and favorite designs” Log cabin and Lone Star”, all in one quilt. Note the careful piecing and nice quilting. Fabric selection by a Mennonite woman and pieced and quilted by Amish women. Is hard to capture the vibrant colors, so samples of fabric are available.
  • A wonderful sharp Lone Star in lovely green earth-tone colors. Very attractive fabric selections. Note the careful piecing and nice quilting. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman and quilted by a Amish woman.
  • Lovely Plum and Rose floral prints make this a very attractive quilt, light side has a tone on tone fine print. It features two popular quilt designs all in one, the Lone Star and the Log Cabin. Notice the lovelyquilting design around star points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman. Nicely quilted by an Amish woman in her home.
  • Definitely a Heirloom quilt, this is a very special quilt, no two quilts are the same. Very precisely pieced and each patch has quilting on it so it makes for many, many stitches, and about 7 stitches per inch. The back is a print cotton fabric.
  • Gorgeous! Rich vibrant colors in this beautiful quilt. This quilt is a lovely combination of two popular designs in one, the Lone Star and the Log Cabin. Notice the lovely quilting design around star points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman. Very fine quilting in this quilt. Quilted by an Amish woman in her home.
  • Enjoy Kaffe Fassett’s amazing line of shot cotton woven stripes from caterpillar woven to exotic stripes in dusk and purples and orange, Roman stripes in narrow and broad stripes. A luminary in the world of textiles and hand quilting. This was hand quilted by our Amish friend using 8 hand stitches per inch.
  • A sharp but stunning King size design in beautiful 100% cotton fabrics in shades of blues and light, almost white/ sandy neutrals – flowing into a great blending falls of 24 100% quilters cotton fabrics. It will definitely be the centerpiece of any bedroom. Gorgeous fabrics selected by the quilts designer C Jean Horst. Well made with excellent patchwork sewing. This quilt is beautifully hand quilted using 8 hand stitches by a local Amish woman. Signed by CJH, it’s designer. The back of the quilt is covered with a beautiful batik blue print of 100% cotton fabric shown on one of the photo shots. The quilting density is good, averaging about 100 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The hand quilting is wonderful with 8 tiny stitches per inch and the quilt has a back corner tag that documents the name of the quilt pattern, designer, fabric content and made in USA by our Amish friends.
  • The back of the quilt is covered with solid cream white cotton fabric. The quilting density is good, averaging about 100 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is beautiful with about 9 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Wow! This quilt in black and burgundy is stunning!! This quilt features two very popular quilt patterns combined into one lovely quilt. Note the careful piecing and nice fine quilting stitches. The background fabric is a fine swirl designed print cotton print. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman. The quilting was done by a Amish woman in her home.
  • The back of this quilt is covered with a solid cream cotton fabric. The quilting density is good with about 110 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is good with about 6-7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • The back of the quilt is covered with a tone on tone print cotton fabric. The stitching is beautiful with about 6 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Notice the beautiful quilting on the border of this quilt. Quilting is extra fine even stitches at 8 stitches per inch. Backing is a solid sheet of tan tone on tone fabric. A high quality quilt.
  • Backing is one piece with a tone on tone tan print. Quilting is 7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Wedding Ring Quilts are the perfect gift for a Wedding gift, Anniversary gift or just for you !! This classic design comes in a beautiful purple and sage green colors. The background tone on tone cream off white cotton print. Be sure to note the extra quilting between each piece of the rings! Was pieced by a Mennonite woman in her home and then quilted by a Amish woman.
  • A beautiful quilt of Brown, Blue -Aqua and Cream fabrics complete this quilt featuring two very popular quilt designs, the Log Cabin and the Lone Star. This elegant quilt has fabrics from the Northcott Artisan line and has a soft gold shimmer. Notice the fine quilting design around the stars points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman and quilted by an Amish woman in her home.

All Quilts

People from all over the world come to Lancaster Pennsylvania to purchase quilts made by Amish and Mennonite women. These Amish quilts with roots in many cultures are viewed today as quintessentially American. Most first time visitors are taken aback by the great variety of design and coloring, as well as the intricacy of quilts on display.

Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people’s American homes. What’s more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.


Showing 1–100 of 2883 results

  • Classic design and brilliant coloring. A fabulous display of hand quilting. Will dazzle any quilt lover. Named after a northeastern Indiana township. The quilt top was made by an Amish woman living near there and the quilting was done by one of her Amish neighbors. Includes a sleeve for a hanging rod. This quilt would look amazing in a home or office!
  • Sharp! Wonderful collection of fabrics from this quilters bag of remnants. Remnants are oldies and current fabrics. Classic log cabin design well made by a local Mennonite woman. Nicely quilted and carefully pieced.
  • Wow! A very beautiful quilt in lovely Navy and Blue colors. What great fabric selections put into a quilt blending two favorite patterns, Log Cabin and Lone Star!!!! The background fabric is a soft tan swirl design print. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman and very finely quilted by a Amish woman in her home.
  • The Log Cabin quilt design is one of the oldest and best loved of all quilts. Here the classic design made new! Nicely pieced and beautifully hand quilted. Pieced and quilted by Amish woman.
  • The back of this quilt is covered with a solid cream cotton fabric. The quilting density is good with about 110 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is good with 7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • A stunning Lone Star with true brilliant red, orange and yellow cotton fabrics! The cotton background fabric is midnight blue (just a touch away from black). Note the fine abundant quilting and exceptionally careful piecing! The quilt top was made by an Amish woman living in north eastern Indiana and the quilting was done by one of her Amish neighbors. Includes a sleeve for a hanging rod. This wall hanging would look amazing in your home or office!
  • A stunning, beautiful quilt. Featuring bright fabrics blended into a lovely combination of two very popular and favorite designs” Log cabin and Lone Star”, all in one quilt. Note the careful piecing and nice quilting. Fabric selection by a Mennonite woman and pieced and quilted by Amish women. Is hard to capture the vibrant colors, so samples of fabric are available.
  • A wonderful sharp Lone Star in lovely green earth-tone colors. Very attractive fabric selections. Note the careful piecing and nice quilting. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman and quilted by a Amish woman.
  • Lovely Plum and Rose floral prints make this a very attractive quilt, light side has a tone on tone fine print. It features two popular quilt designs all in one, the Lone Star and the Log Cabin. Notice the lovelyquilting design around star points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman. Nicely quilted by an Amish woman in her home.
  • Definitely a Heirloom quilt, this is a very special quilt, no two quilts are the same. Very precisely pieced and each patch has quilting on it so it makes for many, many stitches, and about 7 stitches per inch. The back is a print cotton fabric.
  • Gorgeous! Rich vibrant colors in this beautiful quilt. This quilt is a lovely combination of two popular designs in one, the Lone Star and the Log Cabin. Notice the lovely quilting design around star points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman. Very fine quilting in this quilt. Quilted by an Amish woman in her home.
  • Enjoy Kaffe Fassett’s amazing line of shot cotton woven stripes from caterpillar woven to exotic stripes in dusk and purples and orange, Roman stripes in narrow and broad stripes. A luminary in the world of textiles and hand quilting. This was hand quilted by our Amish friend using 8 hand stitches per inch.
  • A sharp but stunning King size design in beautiful 100% cotton fabrics in shades of blues and light, almost white/ sandy neutrals – flowing into a great blending falls of 24 100% quilters cotton fabrics. It will definitely be the centerpiece of any bedroom. Gorgeous fabrics selected by the quilts designer C Jean Horst. Well made with excellent patchwork sewing. This quilt is beautifully hand quilted using 8 hand stitches by a local Amish woman. Signed by CJH, it’s designer. The back of the quilt is covered with a beautiful batik blue print of 100% cotton fabric shown on one of the photo shots. The quilting density is good, averaging about 100 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The hand quilting is wonderful with 8 tiny stitches per inch and the quilt has a back corner tag that documents the name of the quilt pattern, designer, fabric content and made in USA by our Amish friends.
  • The back of the quilt is covered with solid cream white cotton fabric. The quilting density is good, averaging about 100 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is beautiful with about 9 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Wow! This quilt in black and burgundy is stunning!! This quilt features two very popular quilt patterns combined into one lovely quilt. Note the careful piecing and nice fine quilting stitches. The background fabric is a fine swirl designed print cotton print. Made in Lancaster by a Mennonite woman. The quilting was done by a Amish woman in her home.
  • The color, shape and the dimension in this Tumbling Block displays C Jean Horst’s disciplined ability to arrange colors in a totally symmetrical way and yet produce a complex overall design. There are stars and three dimensional blocks, easy to spot with careful inspection. Also the blocks rotate around a small black star central to the quilt. The light colored top of each block moves as the blocks rotate around, forming a jagged circle. Perhaps the quilt gets its name from the multiple lines of symmetry that intersect and echo throughout, or possibly from the way the colored blocks seem to tumble out from the center black star. The quilting was done inside the blocks. Squint your eyes and enjoy a somewhat different view of this kaleidoscope of color. ! Magnificant office wall or foyer piece. 100% cotton fabrics. Sleeve has been added for hanging or it could be used as a throw. This has 8 hand quilted stitches per inch and is well quilted. 100% cotton fabrics !
  • A wonderful variation on the classic Ocean Wave design with a great combination of bold and subdued fabrics. Note the care taken with the patchwork piecing and the fine abundant quilting. Made by an Amish woman from northeastern Indiana and quilted by an Amish neighbor. Initials of both women are quilted into the sash along with the year. The sash is light pink. Part of the “Quilts Remembered Collection”. Includes a sleeve for a hanging rod. This quilt would look great used as a wall hanging or an extra special crib quilt.
  • The back of this quilt is covered with a solid cream cotton fabric. The quilting density is good with about 110 linear inches of stitching per square foot. The stitching is good with about 6-7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • The back of the quilt is covered with a tone on tone print cotton fabric. The stitching is beautiful with about 6 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Notice the beautiful quilting on the border of this quilt. Quilting is extra fine even stitches at 8 stitches per inch. Backing is a solid sheet of tan tone on tone fabric. A high quality quilt.
  • Just in time to make your home or business shine for the Autumn season! One of our most beloved patterns! Great fabric selections. Very fine hand quilting. Excellent piecing. Made by an Amish woman living in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Has fabric tabs on the back for a hanging rod. The back of the quilt is covered with a pretty floral fabric.
  • Backing is one piece with a tone on tone tan print. Quilting is 7 stitches per inch. A high quality quilt.
  • Wedding Ring Quilts are the perfect gift for a Wedding gift, Anniversary gift or just for you !! This classic design comes in a beautiful purple and sage green colors. The background tone on tone cream off white cotton print. Be sure to note the extra quilting between each piece of the rings! Was pieced by a Mennonite woman in her home and then quilted by a Amish woman.
  • A beautiful quilt of Brown, Blue -Aqua and Cream fabrics complete this quilt featuring two very popular quilt designs, the Log Cabin and the Lone Star. This elegant quilt has fabrics from the Northcott Artisan line and has a soft gold shimmer. Notice the fine quilting design around the stars points. Fabrics chosen by a local Mennonite woman and quilted by an Amish woman in her home.

Amish Quilts

Within the Amish and Mennonite communities here, quilts have special significance. Quilts are made in these communities to mark marriages and births and therefore are made with love and special attention to detail. This same care and love can often be seen in the Amish quilts that are made for sale to outsiders.   Amish Country Quilts has since 2001 been shipping the best of the quilts offered for sale here in Lancaster to wonderful customers across America and around the world.

All the ‘Amish quilts’ offered for sale here share a common set of characteristics which collectively set them aside from quilts in general. The key characteristics for what we call Amish quilts begin with how they are intended to be used, and carries on with what goes into each quilt, and how and by whom they are made.

 

Amish quilts, while beautiful and certainly works-of-art, are made with the intention that they will actually be used as bed coverings and baby quilts. With strong seams and colorfast fabrics they are made to be laundered. And so even with daily use and reasonable care they can easily become family heirlooms. Wall hanging size Amish quilts are made in the same way.

Amish quilts are entirely hand quilted. The quilt top, batting, and quilt backing fabric are sandwiched together and held taut in a quilting frame. The quilter then uses needle and thread to place each quilting stitch in the quilt. A typical queen size bed quilt will have forty to fifty thousand such stitches. The quilting stitches are small (6 to 12 per inch), straight and uniform. To insure uniformity all the quilting for each quilt is done by one quilter.

Variety of design is the rule for Amish quilts. While the quilts Amish make for use in their own homes employ classic geometric designs with solid color fabrics and a limited range of colors, the quilts that they make for others include the classic designs but also applique work, embroidery, and brightly colored printed fabrics.

To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.

Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs ‘a ton!’) practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.

Patchwork piecing of Amish quilts is usually done with a sewing machine. Connecting patchwork pieces together this way makes the quilt very strong. What’s more, this stitching can not be seen once the quilt is completed. Amish women have used non-electric sewing machines since they first became available over 150 years ago. On the other hand, applique work is all done by hand, as is most embroidery and binding.

Quilting is often thought of as communal activity such as a quilting bee where woman gather around a quilt frame to quilt a bed quilt. With Amish quilts today two, three or four people may work together to make a single quilt, but instead of quilting together each takes on a one or more of steps in the quilt making process. The first step in the process is to select the quilt’s design and select and purchase the fabrics to be used in the quilt. Second step is to assemble the quilt top. Third step is to do the quilting and the fourth step is add the binding and ready the quilt for sale. It is not unusual for a different person to do each step. But the most common practice is for one person to do steps one, two and four and another person to the quilting. Occasionally a single person will do it all. The reason for the division of labor is that the work involved in each of the steps is quite different. The ability and artistic talent to select fabrics is not common –better for someone with this talent to apply it to the making of many quilts. Piecing a particular quilt top becomes easier and the workmanship better after quilter has made a half dozen tops of that design. So it is best to turn to a woman who is expert with a particular design to make the quilt top with that design. Quilting usually is not specialized to a particular design or style of quilt and is less cerebral — in fact it may be a great distraction from the problems of the day. Applying the binding and readying the quilt for sale — which means finding and removing spots, finding then adding missing lines of quilting, requires attention to detail. The coordination of the whole process is usually done by the person selecting the design and fabrics. This person selects Amish and Mennonite friends to work with on each quilt. Each person working on the quilt works on it in their own home. All work is done in America.

The quality of an Amish quilt is dependent on persons making the quilt and their standards and attention to detail. Anyone who has made a quilt knows how many things can go wrong in making a quilt. But with the right experienced people working carefully, wonderful quilts can be made. The quilts shown here are made in that fashion.

Amish Country Quilts is a marketplace not a quilt shop. Quilts listed here have been listed by the individuals responsible for them. When you purchase a quilt you will be purchasing it from the person who listed it. That person will accept your payment and ship your quilt to you. Each of these individuals pay a small commission on each sale to Amish Country Quilts in return for being listed here. Amish Country Quilts is based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is operated by Doug Stuart.

Welcome to Amish Country Lanes

People from all over the world come to Lancaster Pennsylvania to purchase quilts made by Amish and Mennonite women. These Amish quilts with roots in many cultures are viewed today as quintessentially American. Most first time visitors are taken aback by the great variety of design and coloring, as well as the intricacy of quilts on display.

Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people’s American homes. What’s more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.